24th October 2018

Practice Paragraph

Romeo and Juliet uses conflict and opposites to expand its ideas.

“The earth that’s nature’s mother is her tomb; What is her burying grave, that is her womb”

“The grey-ey’d morn smiles on the frowning night”

“What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.”

The conflicts have been going on for so long no one seems to know why (we are never told why there is conflict between the families)

“‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot, Nor arm nor face, nor any other part belonging to a man. What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet. So Romeo would, if he were not Romeo call’d, retain that dear perfection which he owes without that title. Romeo, doff thy name.”

The play “Romeo and Juliet” uses many types of conflicts and opposites to expand its ideas. We as the reader are never actually informed why the Capulet and Montague families are in conflict. This may be because the conflict has been going on for so long none of the characters actually know. Juliet says “‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.” In this quote, Juliet is saying that it is just the name ‘Montague’ that is her enemy, and how Romeo would still be himself if he were not a Montague.

The deep hate between the families is also shown by the quote “What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” 

unintelligent hatered; no meaning

Respond now!

Category

Writing